Fodors Travel Guide

14 Skyscrapers That Look Like They’re From the Future

The human impulse to build into the skies has produced a planet full of modern skyscrapers. Yet, the allure of these man-made giants lies not in their staggering scale alone. Skyscrapers can also be symbolic and sculptural, or experimental and playful. As architects smash the known limits of engineering and technology, new and astounding structures continue to rise from the ground. Whether you are an architecture aficionado or just love heights and incredible views, here’s our roundup of the coo
Fodors Travel Guide

The Planet’s Most Amazing Trees and Where to Find Them

From evergreen giants to bulbous oddities, here is our roundup of the most amazing trees on the planet. Trees are amazing. We walk amongst them and climb them, and they are the subject of countless folk tales and legends. Trees have kept us warm and provided us with shelter for millennia. They give us sustenance and medicine. Many trees outlive us by centuries, and many have stood as silent witnesses to generations of history. Trees are astonishing in their variety. Designated a UNESCO World He
National Geographic

These People Have a Mind-Bending Way to Navigate

The door of Sivek’s house looks out on a rising slope. But when he walks away from the door toward the rear of the building, he is walking “uphill”—even though the floor is flat. That’s because in Sivek’s tongue, indoor space is defined by imaginary slopes that are totally distinct from the world outside. This is one of the most striking features of the Yupno language, spoken by around 8,000 people in the Finisterre mountain range of Papua New Guinea. While many languages around the world make
The Smithsonian Magazine

To Stop Mosquito Bites, Silence Your Skin's Bacteria

Texas scientists tricked mosquitoes into skipping a blood meal by modifying the way bacteria talk to each other. Evening picnics in a park, sunset beers by a lake and warm nights with the windows open are just some of the delights of midsummer. But as dusk falls, one of the most infuriating creatures on the planet stirs: the mosquito. Outdoor activities are abandoned in an ankle-scratching frenzy and sleep is disturbed as we haplessly swat at the whining source of our torment
Good magazine

These Extreme Travelers Fulfilled Their Craziest Dreams

Travelers love action and far-flung locations, especially when they can be jumped off, white-water-rafted down, or climbed up. The biggest waterfall, the longest river, the tallest building, and other notable quests are featured on many people’s bucket lists. But, the dream to undertake an extreme journey or visit an extreme place can signify more than simply checking a box on a list. GOOD talked to two inspiring travelers who fulfilled their own extreme travel dreams about the lessons the adven
Smithsonian

10 Bizarre, Vision-Enhancing Technologies From the Last 1,000 Years

The current boom in wearable and immersive technology will forever alter how we see and interact with the world. From Oculus headsets that jettison us through time and space, and FOVE eye-tracking technology that uses subtle movements to control virtual reality environments, to conceptual designs for contact lenses with cameras that trigger when a wearer blinks, our augmented vision is stretching our conception of reality. Yet the desire to manipulate, correct or extend what we see is not an exc
BBC Wildlife

How do sea turtles find their way home? | Discover Wildlife

Nesting sea turtles require a delicate ecological mix: the right sand, the correct temperature and an easily accessible beach with few predators. To be sure of laying their eggs in the best place, the turtles go back to the beach where they hatched themselves – if it worked for their mothers, so it should work for them. By studying nesting sites in Florida, a team from the University of North Carolina has discovered that the turtles seek out unique magnetic signatures along the coast. As hatchl
Good magazine

Pro Travelers Share Life Lessons from the Road

Famed travel writer Pico Iyer once said, “We travel, initially, to lose ourselves; and we travel, next, to find ourselves.” No matter who you are or where you go, travel is likely to change you. (Whether that change is permanent or something that wears off can be a subject of debate.) But for those who make seeing the world a major priority, rather than an occasional escape, getting some new perspective becomes a matter of course. GOOD asked four seasoned wanderers to share their most memorable
Chemical & Engineering News

How to empower the next generation of chemists

Andrea d’Aquino did not have a home computer while growing up in Bellingham, Wash. Rather than let that stop her, she spent hours in the school library researching how to fund her education. “I come from a very big family, and no one had gone on to higher education,” says d’Aquino. “No one could quite tell me how you pay for college or get into college.” Fortunately, she won a scholarship from the Gates Millennium Scholars Program and undertook her undergraduate studies at Western Washington Un
Good magazine

Breaking Down Our Bilingual Double Standard

It was medieval emperor-king Charlemagne who said, “To have another language is to possess another soul.” Considered by many to be the father of Europe, Charlemagne was a man of many languages, displaying a knack for Latin, Greek, and other European tongues. Yet more than two millennia later, our views on multilingualism have lost some of this nuanced perspective—despite research that demonstrates again and again just how beneficial it is to grow up multilingual.
BBC Wildlife

Do bats touch anything during flight? | Discover Wildlife

Yes. The role of hearing and vision in the flight of bats is well known, but a recent study has shown that touch also plays a part. These nocturnal hunters perform complex mid-air manoeuvres, yet they don’t bump into obstacles nor collide with each other. A joint team from Columbia and Johns Hopkins Universities has found that an array of sensory receptors in bats’ wings provide them with tactile feedback during flight that, combined with other sensory information, enables them to carry out thei
Aeon Magazine

The terror and the bliss of sleep paralysis – Karen Emslie – Aeon

Here I am, lying in bed. If you walk in now, you’ll think I’m sleeping. But I see you. Although my eyelids look shut, they are fluttering slightly. They are the only parts of me that I can move. I am fully conscious but I cannot shout out to you: my body is completely frozen. Everybody is paralysed during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, the stage of sleep where dreaming occurs. If we weren’t paralysed, we would act out our dreams, endangering ourselves and our sleeping partners. But sometimes,
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